Jennie Huang

Jennie Huang
  • Applied Economics Doctoral Student

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    3000 Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: behavioral economics, experimental economics

Research

  • Jennie Huang and Corinne Low (Draft), The Public Face of Masculinity: The Impact of Gender on Negotiation Strategies and Outcomes.

    Abstract: This paper studies how information about gender affects negotiation strategy and payoffs. We find that men tailor their negotiation strategies based on negotiating partner gender, but in the opposite direction from what one might expect. Men are significantly less likely to use tough (and effective) negotiation strategies against female partners than against male partners. In mixed gender pairs, gender information combined with the ability to communicate harms men and benefits women. We present suggestive evidence that men may be "constrained" by gender norms in their communication strategy---leading them to be more chivalrous to women and "tough" toward men---at the expense of their own payoffs.

  • Jennie Huang and Corinne Low (2017), Trumping Norms: Lab Evidence on Aggressive Communication before and after the 2016 US Presidential Election, American Economic Review, Papers and Proceedings, 5. 10.1257/aer.p20171016

Teaching

Past Courses

  • BEPP250 - MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS

    This course will introduce you to "managerial economics" which is the application of microeconomic theory to managerial decision-making. Microeconomic theory is a remarkably useful body of ideas for understanding and analyzing the behavior of individuals and firms in a variety of economic settings. The goal of the course is for you to understand this body of theory well enough so that you can effectively analyze managerial (and other) problems in an economic framework. While this is a "tools" course, we will cover many real-world applications, particularly business applications, so that you can witness the usefulness of these tools and acquire the skills to use them yourself. We will depart from the usual microeconomic theory course by giving more emphasis to prescription: What should a manager do in order to achieve some objective? That course deliverable is to compared with description: Why do firms and consumers act the way they do? The latter will still be quite prominent in this course because only by understanding how other firms and customers behave can a manager determin what is best for him or her to do. Strategic interaction is explored both in product markets and auctions. Finally, the challenges created by asymmetric information - both in the market and within the firm - are investigated.

Awards and Honors

  • Wharton Risk Center Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award, 2018-2019
  • Wharton Risk Center Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award, 2017-2018
  • Wharton Risk Center Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award, 2016-2017
  • Wharton Risk Center Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award, 2015-2016
  • Wharton Doctoral Programs Fellowship, 2014-2018

Activity

Latest Research

Jennie Huang and Corinne Low (Draft), The Public Face of Masculinity: The Impact of Gender on Negotiation Strategies and Outcomes.
All Research

Awards and Honors

Wharton Risk Center Russell Ackoff Doctoral Student Fellowship Award 2018
All Awards