Arie P. Schinnar

Arie P. Schinnar
  • Associate Professor Emeritus of Business Economics and Public Policy

Contact Information

Research Interests: corporate performance, governance, executive pay, human resource management and market competition, managed care in behavioral health, productivity management in government

Overview

Education

PhD, Carnegie Mellon University, 1976; March, State University of New York at Buffalo, 1973; BED, Texas A&M University, 1971

Recent Consulting

Executive compensation, CIGNA, 1999; Corporate governance, McKinsey & Co., 1998; International real estate, Faktor, Frankfurt, 1995; Age discrimination, Provident Life & Casualty Insurance, 1995; Public Management, Office of Mental Health, City of Philadelphia, 1995

Academic Positions Held

Wharton: 1983-present (Director, Gruss Public Management Program, 1997-2002; Academic Director, Petroleum Management Executive Program, joint with Institut Francais du Petrole, Paris, 1989-93; Director, Policy Modeling Workshop, 1983-93). University of Pennsylvania: 1976-present (Co-Director, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, Department of Psychiatry, 1993-1996; Associate Director, Energy Center, Graduate School of Fine Arts, 1987-91; Founding Director, Policy Modeling Workshop, School of Public and Urban Policy, 1981- 83). Previous appointments: Carnegie Mellon University; State University of New York at Buffalo. Visiting appointments: The Johns Hopkins University; Carnegie Mellon University

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Knowledge@Wharton

What Will Maduro’s Re-election Mean for Venezuela?

Following Venezuela’s presidential election on Sunday, experts say the country’s economic and humanitarian crises will only worsen unless key players like Russia and China work with the U.S. to find a solution.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/05/22
Network Synergy: A New Way to Value M&A

Research by Wharton’s Exequiel Hernandez shows that corporate alliances matter nearly as much as internal synergies in valuing M&A.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/05/22
Can Bundled Payments Help Control Health Care Costs?

Hospitals can cut medical bills and raise the quality of care by bundling up multiple services in one bill, notes new research by Penn medicine's Amol Navathe.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/05/21