Arthur van Benthem

Arthur van Benthem
  • Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    1354 Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall
    3620 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: energy economics, environmental economics, public economics

Links: Personal Website, CV

Overview

Arthur van Benthem is an Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at Wharton. His research specializes in environmental and energy economics. His recent work focuses on unintended consequences of environmental legislation and the economic efficiency of energy policies.

He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Stanford University in 2012, a masters degree in Management Science & Engineering from Stanford, and his undergraduate degree from the University of Amsterdam.

Before pursuing his doctoral studies at Stanford, he worked in various roles at Royal Dutch Shell, most recently in corporate strategy as an energy economist in the Long-Term Energy Scenarios Team. During his undergraduate studies, Arthur enjoyed working as an evening stock trader at IMC Trading in Amsterdam.

For more information, please visit my personal website.

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Teaching

Past Courses

  • BEPP263 - ENVIRON. & ENERGY ECON

    This course examines environmental and energy issues from an economist's perspective. Over the last several decades, energy markets have become some of the most dynamic markets of the world economy, as they experienced a shift from heavy regulation to market-driven incentives. First, we look at scarcity pricing and market power in electricity and gasoline markets. We then study oil and gas markets, with an emphasis on optimal extraction and pricing, and geopolitical risks that investors in hydrocarbon resources face. We then shift gears to the sources of environmental problems, and how policy makers can intervene to solve some of these problems. We talk about the economic rationale for a broad range of possible policies: environmental taxes, subsidies, performance standards and cap-and-trade. In doing so, we discuss fundamental concepts in environmental economics, such as externalities, valuation of the environment and the challenge of designing international agreements. At the end of the course, there will be special attention for the economics and finance of renewable energy and policies to foster its growth. Finally, we discuss the transportation sector, and analyze heavily debated policies such as fuel-economy standards and subsidies for green vehicles.

  • BEPP763 - ENERGY MARKETS & POLICY

    Over the last several decades, energy markets have become some of the most dynamic markets of the world economy. Traditional fossil fuel and electricity markets have been seen a partial shift from heavy regulation to market-driven incentives, while rising environmental concerns have led to a wide array of new regulations and "environmental markets". The growth of renewable energy could be another source of rapid change, but brings with it a whole new set of tecnological and policy challenges. This changing energy landscape requires quick adaptation from energy companies, but also offers opportunities to turn regulations into new business. The objective of this course is to provide students with the economist's perspective on a broad range of topics that professionals in the energy industry will encounter. Topics include the effect of competition, market power and scarcity on energy prices, the impact of deregulation on electricity and fossil fuel markets, extraction and pricing of oil and gas, geopolitical uncertainty and risk in hydrocarbon investments, the environmental impact and policies related to the energy sector, environmental cap-and-trade markets, energy efficiency, the economics and finance of renewable energy, and recent developments in the transportation sector.

  • OIDD263 - ENVIRON. & ENERGY ECON

    This course examines environmental and energy issues from an economist's perspective. Over the last several decades, energy markets have become some of the most dynamic markets of the world economy, as they experienced a shift from heavy regulation to market-driven incentives. First we look at scarcity pricing and market power in electricity and gasoline markets. We then study oil and gas markets, with an emphasis on optimal extraction and pricing, and geopolitical risks that investors in hyrocarbon resources face. We then shift gears to the sources of environmental problems (many of which are energy-related), and policy makers can intervene to solve some of these problems. We talk about the economic rationale for a broad range of possible policies: environmental taxes, subsidies, performance standards and cap-and-trade. In doing so, we discuss fundamentalconcepts in environmental economics such as externalities, valuation of the environment and the challenge of designing international agreements. At the end of the course, there will be special attention for the economics and finance of renewable energy and policies to foster its growth. Finally, we discuss the transportation sector, and anaylze heavily debated policies such as fuel-economy standards and subsidies for green vehicles.

  • OIDD763 - ENERGY MARKETS & POLICY

In the News

Activity

In the News

When Will Electric Cars Go Mainstream?

Subsidies and lower battery costs have not been enough to mainstream electric cars. Still, large gains have come amid worries about costs and driving range.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2017/01/6
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