Scott E. Harrington

Scott E. Harrington
  • Alan B. Miller Professor
  • Professor of Health Care Management
  • Chair, Health Care Management Department

Contact Information

  • office Address:

    206 Colonial Penn Center
    3641 Locust Walk
    Philadelphia, PA 19104

Research Interests: health care finance and economics; insurance markets and regulation

Links: CV, Personal Website, Twitter

Overview

Scott E. Harrington, Ph.D. (http://www.scottharringtonphd.com/) is the Alan B. Miller Professor and chair of the Health Care Management Department with a secondary appointment in Business Economics and Public Policy.  He is also a Senior Fellow with the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics and an Adjunct Scholar for health policy at the American Enterprise Institute. A former President of both the American Risk and Insurance Association and the Risk Theory Society, he is a Co-Editor of the Journal of Risk and Insurance and has published widely on the economics and regulation of insurance. A frequent speaker on health insurance reform and insurance markets and regulation, he has conducted research, consulted, or served as an expert for many organizations. He has testified before the U.S. House and Senate on insurance regulation, including testimony on Affordable Care Act rate review and Consumer Operated and Oriented Plans and whether insurance poses systemic risk. His recent policy research has focused on the ACA’s impact on health insurance markets and on insurance financial regulatory issues. He teaches courses on health care finance and the U.S. health care system.

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Research

  • Scott E. Harrington (2017), Stabilizing Individual Health Insurance Markets with Subsidized Reinsurance, Penn/LDI Issue Brief.

  • Mark V. Pauly, Scott E. Harrington, Adam Leive (2015), “Sticker Shock” in Individual Insurance under Health Reform?, American Journal of Health Economics, 1, pp. 494-514.

    Description: with Mark Pauly and Adam Leive

  • Scott E. Harrington, “U.S. Health Care Reform”. In Research Handbook on the Economics of Insurance Law, edited by Daniel Schwarcz and Peter Siegelman, (Elgar Publishing, 2015)

  • Scott E. Harrington (2013), Medical Loss Ratio Regulation under the Affordable Care Act, Inquiry, 50, pp. 9-26.

  • Scott E. Harrington, “Cost of Capital for Pharmaceutical, Biotechnology, and Medical Device Firms”. In Handbook of the Economics of the Biopharmaceutical Industry, edited by Patricia Danzon and Sean Nicholson, (Oxford University Press, 2012)

  • Guy David and Scott E. Harrington (2010), Population Density and Racial Differences in the Performance of Emergency Medical Services, Journal of Health Economics, July 2010, Vol. 29(4), pp 603-615. 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2010.03.004

    Abstract: This paper analyzes the existence and scope of possible racial differences/disparities in the provision of emergency medical services (EMS) response capability (time from dispatch to arrival at the scene and level of training of the responding team) using data on approximately 120,000 cardiac incidents in the state of Mississippi during 1995–2004. The conceptual framework and empirical analysis focus on the likely effects of population density on the efficient production of EMS as a local public good subject to congestion, and on the need to control adequately for population density to avoid bias in testing for racial differences. Models that control for aggregate population density at the county-level indicate “reverse” disparities: faster estimated response times for African-Americans than for whites. When a refined county-level measure of population density is used that incorporates differences in African-American and white population density by Census tract, the reverse disparity in response times disappears. There also is little or no evidence of race-related differences in the certification level of EMS responders. However, there is evidence that, controlling for response time, African-Americans on average were significantly more likely to be deceased than whites upon EMS arrival at the scene. The overall results are germane to the debate over the scope of conditioning variables that should be included when testing for racial disparities in health care.

  • Scott E. Harrington (2010), The Health Insurance Reform Debate, The Journal of Risk and Insurance, 77: 5-38.

    Abstract: This article provides an overview of the U.S. health care reform debate and legislation, with a focus on health insurance. Following a synopsis of the main problems that confront U.S. health care and insurance, it outlines the health care reform bills in the U.S. House and Senate, including the key provisions for expanding and regulating health insurance, and projections of the proposals’ costs, funding, and impact on the number of people with insurance. The article then discusses (1) the potential effects of the mandate that individuals have health insurance in conjunction with proposed premium subsidies and health insurance underwriting and rating restrictions, (2) the proposed creation of a public health insurance plan and/or non-profit cooperatives, and (3) provisions that would modify permissible grounds for health policy rescission and repeal the limited antitrust exemption for health and medical liability insurance. It concludes by contrasting the reform bills with market-oriented proposals and with brief perspective on future developments.

  • Scott E. Harrington (2009), The Financial Crisis, Systemic Risk, and the Future of Insurance Regulation, The Journal of Risk and Insurance, 76: 785-819.

    Abstract: This article considers the role of American International Group (AIG) and the insurance sector in the 2007–2009 financial crisis and the implications for insurance regulation. Following an overview of the causes of the crisis, I explore the events and policies that contributed to federal government intervention to prevent bankruptcy of AIG and the scope of federal assistance to AIG. I discuss the extent to which insurance in general poses systemic risk and whether a systemic risk regulator is desirable for insurers or other nonbank financial institutions. The last two sections of the article address the financial crisis's implications for proposed optional and/or mandatory federal chartering and regulation of insurers and for insurance regulation in general.

Teaching

Past Courses

  • HCMG101 - HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS

    This introductory course takes a policy and politics angle to health care's three persistent issues - access, cost and quality. The roles of patients, physicians, hospitals, insurers, and pharmaceutical companies will be established. The interaction between the government and these different groups will also be covered. Current national health care policy initiatives and the interests of class members will steer the specific topics covered in the course. The course aims to provide skills for critical and analytical thought about the U.S. health care system and the people in it.

  • HCMG849 - FIN MGMT HEALTH INST

    This course focuses on health care organizations' financial decisions in the changing health care landscape. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to utilize a range of financial tools and techniques for making value-added financial decisions in a variety of important contexts in the health care sector. The course involves case analyses and lectures, including presentations by practitioners with extensive real world experience. The course is organized around cases dealing with publicly-traded health care company valuation, valuation and return on investment of biopharmaceutical and medical technology development projects, valuation and deal structure for startup and early stage health care organizations, health plan pricing and finance, and health care provider risk-sharing arrangements. Each case is accompanied by background on tools, methods, institutions, and markets. Students seeking careers in health care finance and financial decision making. Students with more background will extend and enhance their analytical skills in a variety of important areas.

  • HCMG900 - PROSEMINAR IN HSR

    900-001 Proseminar in Health Econometrics: This course will cover empirical methods used in economics research with an emphasis on applications in health care and public economics. The methods covered include linear regression, matching, panel data models, instrumental variables, regression discontinuity, bunching,qualitative and limited dependent variable models, count data, quantile regressions, and duration models. The discussion will be a mix of theory and application, with emphasis on the latter. The readings consist of a blend of classic and recent methodological and empirical papers in economics . Course requirements include several problem sets, paper presentations, an econometric analysis project and a final exam. The course is open to doctoral students from departments other than Health Care Management with permission from the instructor. 900-002 Proseminar in Health Economics: Models and Methods: This course is intended to provide entering doctoral students with information on the variety of health economics models, methods, topics, and publication outlets valued and used by faculty in the HCMG doctoral program and outside of it. The course has two main parts: the first, to acquaint students with theoretical modeling tools used frequently by health economists. This part of the course involves a number of lectures coupled with students presentations of class projects in a workshop environment. The second part of the course will offer presentations from the health economics, management and operations research community at Penn on a research method or strategy they have found helpful and they think is important for all doctoral students to know.

Activity

In the News

How the ACA ‘Risk Corridor’ Fallout Is Hurting Health Care

Insurers’ inability to recover their dues under an Affordable Care Act risk-sharing program is not only impacting those companies but also causing collateral damage in the marketplace, say experts.

Knowledge @ Wharton - 2018/03/29
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